Twenty sentences that make you a more persuasive writer and communicator

Alex Mathers

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There’s a distinct line that separates people who communicate to deaf ears, and those who rile up crowds with words that drip with a kind of catnip.

Writing well makes for a powerful online brand that will grow your tribe.

Here are some quick bites of knowledge that will help you write and communicate in a way that will make people sit up and take notice:

  • Use assertive language, even if you aren’t sure of the point — you say it like you’ve purged all the doubt.
  • People love to be entertained with humour where appropriate.
  • People are more interested in a larger-than-life version of you where you emphasise some of the characteristics that are unique and interesting about you.
  • Vary the lengths of your sentences to great texture, which leads to a more intriguing experience.
  • Publish what you create even if it isn’t perfect because the ultimate form of persuasiveness is showing up and shipping regularly.
  • End your paragraphs and points on a hard-hitting final statement that ruffles feathers and/or motivates the crap out of your reader.
  • Telling stories will engage the brain and make your words more persuasive and memorable.
  • Acknowledge your reader or listener where you can to show that you understand what they’re going through to deepen your connection.
  • Write about things that make you emotional and things that are often on your mind.
  • Use examples, including stories, images, and even anecdotes to add an extra layer to your point, which helps it lodge in the mind for your listener or reader.
  • When you write or speak, find a way to relax into the flow of it so that readers connect to your living, breathing humanness.
  • It’s not about being superior to your reader, but about showing how you are human so they can see themselves in you.
  • Be polarising and willing to upset some people because those who respond positively are more likely to be loyal.
  • Good writing isn’t about writing, it’s about stirring the soul of a reader.

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